Posts tagged 'e commerce'

Online marketplaces sell unsafe and illegal items

Six consumer groups from the BEUC network tested 250 electrical goods, toys, cosmetics and other products bought from online marketplaces such as Amazon, AliExpress, eBay and Wish. They selected the products based on possible risks and found that 66% of them fail EU safety laws with possible consequences such as electric shock, fire or suffocation.
The products failed safety tests because of a diverse range of issues. These include smoke and carbon monoxide alarms that do not detect smoke or carbon monoxide, toys that contain chemical levels 200 times over the limit and a power bank that melts during testing. In some scenarios this could put consumers in a life-or-death situation.

Although online marketplaces often seem to take down products when informed, they too often reappear1. One of the major problems is that marketplaces do not consider themselves to be liable for the safety of products sold on their platforms and therefore do not seem to sufficiently control the trustworthiness of sellers upfront.
The tests were conducted through the International Consumer Research and Testing (ICRT) network, on behalf of a consortium led by Test Achats/Test Aankoop (Belgium) and which includes Altroconsumo (Italy), Consumentenbond (Netherlands), Forbrugerrådet Tænk (Denmark), Stiftung Warentest (Germany) and Which? (United Kingdom). DECO (Portugal) and OCU (Spain) are also publishing the results.

Products were first submitted to a visual inspection. For some this was enough to declare them unsafe. Take, for example, toys with loose components or hoodies for children with cords that are too long. Most products, such as a plastic doll with a sharp scent, warranted more research. This led products as diverse as jewellery, smoke alarms and Christmas tree lights to be tested in a lab.
more: https://bit.ly/3cavk9N

official controls  europe  e-commerce  BEUC

24-02-2020 21:Feb:th
 

eCommerce: Commission publishes results of first EU-wide control of Internet marketed food

The Commission published the results of the first coordinated official controls of Internet marketed foods carried out by 25 EU Member States, Switzerland and Norway. In September 2017 the competent national authorities checked nearly 1100 websites for offers of non-authorised novel foods and food supplements. They found 779 offers for the sale of products clearly not complying with the EU legislation, whether in terms of labelling, false claims or lack of authorisation.

This was the first time that the national authorities pooled their experience and resources, showing their preparedness to respond to the challenges of the online world and to protect the citizens from unsafe and misleading products offered online.

The main objectives of this first Coordinated Control Plan on the Internet sale of food ('CCP-efood') in the Union were:

  • practice and strengthen the cooperation and administrative assistance between Member State authorities on the control of Internet sales;
  • practice the exchange of information via rapid alert notifications according to Article 50 of Regulation (EC) No 178/2002 (RASFF) and notification under the Administrative Assistance and Cooperation system (AAC system) according to Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2015/19181,2;
  • gain insight into misleading practices in the sale of food supplements;
  • gain insight into the prevalence of unauthorised novel foods sold via Internet;
  • highlight that Internet sales of food are subject to official controls;
  • build know-how on food law enforcement in Internet sales by the authorities.

 

official controls  e-commerce

23-02-2018 09:Feb:rd